Update: After Compromise, Rick Santorum's Speech Back On At Grosse Pointe South High

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Rick Santorum's speaking engagement at Grosse Pointe South High School is back on, after school officials say they reached a compromise to allow parents to choose whether to send their child to the April 24 event, Jennifer Chambers reports.

School officials on Monday had canceled the former presidential candidate's scheduled speech to students, sparking a community uproar. The district announced at 1:45 p.m. Wednesday that parents will be sent an in-school permission form if they want their student to hear Santorum speak during an assembly at the school.

"The compromise was reached today between the Grosse Pointe Public School System administration and the South student club Young Americans for Freedom," district spokeswoman Rebecca Fannon said.

"The district recognizes Mr. Santorum's leadership qualities, having served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1991 to 1995, and in the U.S. Senate from 1995 to 2007. As part of an educational environment, we provide multiple opportunities for our students and staff to hear and examine various viewpoints," the statement says.


Earlier: An April 24 speech to high school students by former presidential candidate Rick Santorum has been canceled by Grosse Pointe Public Schools, "citing an unwillingness to accept the former Pennsylvania senator's stances on traditional marriage," according to the Young Americans Foundation.

Jennifer Chambers reports in The Detroit News that according to the group's website,  Superintendent Thomas Harwood said during a call with a foundation member he "will not allow the already approved speech at Grosse Pointe South Public High School by Santorum because of the senator's stances on some policy issues, namely traditional marriage and education."

The school's Young Americans for Freedom group, the chapter affiliate of the foundation, invited Santorum to the school, the foundation said.

Santorum's Facebook page posted a statement late Monday: "It's a sad day when liberal educators are allowed to influence young minds — extending free speech rights only to those who share their liberal views."

Read more:  Detroit News
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